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10 years celebration

Internationalization

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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Rome

Why choose Zagamilaw

Our team is composed by young, competent and motivated people that would be able to give you suggestions about every aspect of your matter. When we are engaged by a client for a legal case, the same client and the same case become to us absolutely important, in fact every professional of Zagamilaw will constantly assist you with the aid and supervision of the Firm's founder Lawyer Paolo Zagami

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Reggio Calabria

Recruiting

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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New York

Feedback

“Zagamilaw is a fast growing and international business oriented law firm which offers assistance on all legal aspects of Italian residential and commercial real estate transaction and has been appointed between the Top 5 Italian Law firm for the Real Estate sector." - Corporate International Magazine

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Toronto City

International Tax Planning

The International Law Firm "Zagamilaw" is able to assist and advise companies and businesses wishing to implement an efficient international tax planning through proper allocation in different countries of their income derived from investment and management functions of the group, taking into account the different tax regimes and different tax rates adopted by each member, according to a general principle of legal supremacy of internal rules than those of other countries, subject to the existence of international agreements that address conflicts of imputation or double taxation.

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London

Despite Fukushima accident, 30 countries considering nuclear energy says IAEA

30.08.2012 « Back

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in a report posted on its website said the reactor meltdowns in Japan were expected to slow the growth of nuclear power in the world, but not reverse it.
“Among countries introducing nuclear power, interest remains high,” the report said.
“While the Fukushima Daiichi accident caused some countries to change their positions and some to take a ‘wait and see’ approach, interest continued among countries considering or planning for nuclear power introduction,” it said.
The Vienna-based U.N. agency forecast that global nuclear power capacity would grow by 35% by 2030, with the biggest increase in the Far East, a prediction in line with figures it published previously.
Sixty-two reactors are under construction, in addition to the 435 units now in operation. While this is down from a peak of 233 units that were being built in 1979, it is still a rise from figures of 30 to 40 from 1995 to 2005.
The Fukushima nuclear crisis, triggered by a deadly earthquake and tsunami on March 11 last year, raised a question mark over whether atomic energy is safe.
Germany and some European countries decided to move away from nuclear power and increase renewable energy generation instead. But countries such as China and India are expected to press ahead with nuclear plans to help meet their fast-growing demand for power.
The IAEA said factors such as volatile fossil fuel prices and environmental issues, which have driven the increased interest in nuclear power since 2005, have not changed.
Countries such as the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Belarus, Bangladesh and Vietnam have taken concrete steps toward introducing nuclear power, including after Fukushima, it added.
Of the 29 countries now considering or planning for nuclear power most are from Asia and Africa. In 2010, the group of potential nuclear newcomers numbered 34, which was seven more than in 2008, the IAEA report

From: www.mercopress.com