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10 years celebration

Internationalization

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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Rome

Why choose Zagamilaw

Our team is composed by young, competent and motivated people that would be able to give you suggestions about every aspect of your matter. When we are engaged by a client for a legal case, the same client and the same case become to us absolutely important, in fact every professional of Zagamilaw will constantly assist you with the aid and supervision of the Firm's founder Lawyer Paolo Zagami

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Reggio Calabria

Recruiting

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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New York

Feedback

“Zagamilaw is a fast growing and international business oriented law firm which offers assistance on all legal aspects of Italian residential and commercial real estate transaction and has been appointed between the Top 5 Italian Law firm for the Real Estate sector." - Corporate International Magazine

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Toronto City

International Tax Planning

The International Law Firm "Zagamilaw" is able to assist and advise companies and businesses wishing to implement an efficient international tax planning through proper allocation in different countries of their income derived from investment and management functions of the group, taking into account the different tax regimes and different tax rates adopted by each member, according to a general principle of legal supremacy of internal rules than those of other countries, subject to the existence of international agreements that address conflicts of imputation or double taxation.

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London

In this way you empty a tax haven. After the Lux Leaks case, OCSE explains the Beps plan to block this phenomenon.

29.12.2014 « Back

If closing the doors of the tax havens is impossible, you can try another way: make them unusable. And ‘the strategy developed by the OCSE to put an end to the tricks of the multinationals. This was revealed by Pascal Saint Amans, head of the tax department of the Parisian organization and Raf-faele Russo, project manager Beps: a new system of international tax rules that will prevent big companies to shift profits in countries with low or no taxation. The project received the imprimatur of the heads of state of the G20 and has been at the center of Ecofin in December. Expected to become operational in 2016. “At that point – says Saint Amans – tax havens will have no reason to exist. A company can put the seat in the Cayman Islands or in any place, but will still have to pay the taxes in the country where the economic activity and the creation of value really happen. “With the new rules every multinational company must submit a separate budget note for each country in which it operates, specifying production, turnover, number of employees. “We can not prohibit tax havens offer favorable conditions – says Saint Amans – but we can prevent companies to take ad-vantage of it: with Beps operational, will have to demonstrate that there have actually their busi-ness. This will put an end to the divorce between the location of economic activity and the resulting profits. “Russo explains: “If it turns out that a group has 4 thousand employees in Italy, 3 thousand in Germany, 5 thousand in France and 0 to Bermuda, but 80% of the group’s profits are declared in Bermuda, we will have to investigate and ask for explanations.” Even a task as that of Fiat, which has shifted the tax office in London would be useless with Beps active, would not make sense such a structure.

Il Fatto Quotidiano