Rome    Reggio Calabria     New York     Toronto    London

Internationalization

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

CONTINUE READING
Rome

Why choose Zagamilaw

Our team is composed by young, competent and motivated people that would be able to give you suggestions about every aspect of your matter. When we are engaged by a client for a legal case, the same client and the same case become to us absolutely important, in fact every professional of Zagamilaw will constantly assist you with the aid and supervision of the Firm's founder Lawyer Paolo Zagami

CONTINUE READING
Reggio Calabria

Recruiting

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

CONTINUE READING
New York

Feedback

“Zagamilaw is a fast growing and international business oriented law firm which offers assistance on all legal aspects of Italian residential and commercial real estate transaction and has been appointed between the Top 5 Italian Law firm for the Real Estate sector." - Corporate International Magazine

CONTINUE READING
Toronto City

International Tax Planning

The International Law Firm "Zagamilaw" is able to assist and advise companies and businesses wishing to implement an efficient international tax planning through proper allocation in different countries of their income derived from investment and management functions of the group, taking into account the different tax regimes and different tax rates adopted by each member, according to a general principle of legal supremacy of internal rules than those of other countries, subject to the existence of international agreements that address conflicts of imputation or double taxation.

CONTINUE READING
London

Judgment of the Court C-385/12 on taxation issues

24.02.2014 « Back

Because of the financial and economic crisis of the last few years, Member States are giving greater consideration again to a traditional source of revenue: taxation. This not only takes the form of increasing the rates of existing taxes. The introduction of new kinds of tax can also be seen.

The present request for a preliminary ruling concerns such a new kind of tax. In order to cope with higher public financial requirements, for a limited period of time Hungary levied a tax which was based on the turnover of certain undertakings but was associated with a progressive rate that was unusual for such a tax. Of course, criticism of a new tax is no surprise. However, in the present case the Court will consider the question whether the criticism regarding the lawfulness of such a tax under European Union (EU) law is also justified. In this regard, taxable persons in particular claim that because of the progressive scale the tax distorts competition to the detriment of foreign undertakings. It will be necessary to clarify the extent to which such distortions of competition merely give rise to serious economic effects or are, in fact, also incompatible with EU law.

The conclusions of the Court are that articles 49 TFEU and 54 TFEU must be interpreted as precluding legislation of a Member State relating to tax on the turnover of store retail trade which obliges taxable legal persons constituting, within a group, ‘linked undertakings’ within the meaning of that legislation, to aggregate their turnover for the purpose of the application of a steeply progressive rate, and then to divide the resulting amount of tax among them in proportion to their actual turnover, if – and it is for the referring court to determine whether this is the case – the taxable persons covered by the highest band of the special tax are ‘linked’, in the majority of cases, to companies which have their registered office in another Member State.

From curia.europa.eu