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Internationalization

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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Rome

Why choose Zagamilaw

Our team is composed by young, competent and motivated people that would be able to give you suggestions about every aspect of your matter. When we are engaged by a client for a legal case, the same client and the same case become to us absolutely important, in fact every professional of Zagamilaw will constantly assist you with the aid and supervision of the Firm's founder Lawyer Paolo Zagami

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Reggio Calabria

Recruiting

"Zagamilaw" International Law Firm, with its offices in New York, Toronto and London and thanks to the collaboration with its correspondent Partners, offers its activity of international consultancy and legal assistance both towards Italian clients living abroad and foreign clients living in Italy.

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New York

Feedback

“Zagamilaw is a fast growing and international business oriented law firm which offers assistance on all legal aspects of Italian residential and commercial real estate transaction and has been appointed between the Top 5 Italian Law firm for the Real Estate sector." - Corporate International Magazine

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Toronto City

International Tax Planning

The International Law Firm "Zagamilaw" is able to assist and advise companies and businesses wishing to implement an efficient international tax planning through proper allocation in different countries of their income derived from investment and management functions of the group, taking into account the different tax regimes and different tax rates adopted by each member, according to a general principle of legal supremacy of internal rules than those of other countries, subject to the existence of international agreements that address conflicts of imputation or double taxation.

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London

Powering up the EU’s common energy policy

09.09.2012 « Back

The EU could be close to launching a more coherent approach to energy after member states agreed to share information about energy deals with non-EU countries with the Commission once the contracts were signed. However, the Commission and the Parliament will not be able to scrutinise the deals before that happens, under the compromise worked out by MEPs and the Council. The Parliament will vote on the proposal in plenary on Thursday 13 September. In 2011 the Commission proposed new rules on energy deals requiring member states to communicate on all inter-governmental agreements on energy supplies from non-EU countries. This would help the Commission to check that these agreements are in line with EU energy law and enable it to strengthen member states’ position during negotiations.
Energy supply is ensured mostly through bilateral trades, and there is no coherent EU approach to energy relations with non-EU countries. However, there are common EU rules to make sure citizens and companies can enjoy secure and affordable energy supplies.
Initially, the Commission and the Parliament wanted to be able to comb through energy agreements before they were finalised, but this demand was dropped following negotiations with the Council out of fear that otherwise member states would reject the legislation altogether. The compromise was approved by the Parliament’s industry committee on 19 June, although one third of its members voted against.
“Some legislation is better than no legislation. It’s better to have one step, it’s on the books, we can amend it (later) and have it stronger,” said Christian-Democrat MEP Krišjānis Kariņš, who is responsible for steering the legislation through Parliament. The Latvian MEP continued: “This legislation will increase transparency in energy supply agreements with third countries, thereby ensuring that EU law is adhered to. It will also create a base for coordinated action by member states in the field of energy.”
With fewer powers than initially foreseen, the Commission could still play an active role monitoring the conformity of energy deals and will be able to take part in negotiations as an observer, but only with the approval of member states concerned.
The draft decision also addresses confidentiality concerns expressed by some member states. Mr Kariņš explained: “If a government indicates that certain information is confidential then the Commission respects that confidentiality and does not distribute it to other member states. It’s a safeguard.”
Not all MEPs agree with the compromise in its current shape. Social Democrat MEP Peter Skinner said: “For S&D it is essential to have ex ante opinion by the Commission before deals are signed in order to completely verify their compatibility with existing internal energy market legislation.” The British MEP added that S&D will propose new amendments during the plenary process to strengthen the legislation.
Green MEP Claude Turmes, from Luxembourg, added “If we want EU speak with one voice, we need something which goes further.”

From: www.europa.eu